Today was day one of #31HorrorFilms31Days and my first film was JU-ON: THE GRUDGE. I saw the American remake (by Sam Raimi, starring Sarah Michelle Gellar) years ago, and it holds the distinction of being the only horror film to scare me so badly, I swear I was traumatized. It’s been well over a decade now, I have kids and a barely functional brain and no sense of fear remaining, so I thought I’d try the original.

It’s a good film. It has some dodgy special effects, some AMAZING camera work (the wooshing zoom around people to reveal the ghost is REALLY clever). The story leapfrogs from person to person a lot more than I expected, which is an interesting choice. I didn’t find it scary in the slightest, not once, not even for one scene. But is that because it was a genuinely enjoyable but un-scary film, or because I’m messed up and not scared? I’m not sure. It ALSO kept undercutting its own sense of pacing and suspense, seemed slow and less focused than the American remake (which I now wanna revisit).

Still, a good first start to a month of horror. 

laughterkey:

What? No. What?


I SEE YOU BABYSHAKIN DAT ASSSHAKIN DAT ASS

laughterkey:

What? No. What?

I SEE YOU BABY

SHAKIN DAT ASS

SHAKIN DAT ASS

(Source: becausebirds)

"Introverts don’t get lonely if they don’t socialize with a lot of people, but we do get lonely if we don’t have intimate interactions on a regular basis."
— Sophia Dembling, The Introvert’s Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World (Perigee Trade, 2012)

(Source: wordsthat-speak)

Album Art

aintnobodygottimeforthisfandom:

inlove-fallen-angel:

torctarmin:

i-am-mishafuckingcollins:

saintnoah:

mcstump:

altair:

This Is Halloween - Panic! At The Disco

i’ve never hit reblog so quickly omfg

image

ITS JULY

No it’s Halloween

This is amazing

one more month motherfuckers and i’ll be blasting this from a stereo.

Nope. Marilyn Manson cover OR BUST

Played 1768617 times.

bookriot:

Which of these books featuring faeries should you buy, borrow, or bypass? We’ve got the verdicts.

In which I walk through my recent reads, all of which have contained FAERIES

THE BOXTROLLS asked for my mailing address out of the blue, last week, and I gave it to them without hesitation. Today, THIS showed up. I am proper giddy about it. THE BOXTROLLS asked for my mailing address out of the blue, last week, and I gave it to them without hesitation. Today, THIS showed up. I am proper giddy about it. THE BOXTROLLS asked for my mailing address out of the blue, last week, and I gave it to them without hesitation. Today, THIS showed up. I am proper giddy about it.

THE BOXTROLLS asked for my mailing address out of the blue, last week, and I gave it to them without hesitation. Today, THIS showed up. I am proper giddy about it.

maggie-stiefvater:

I love this time of year, in this town. The trees are poised, waiting, their green leaves drying in the memory of another season. The air is clear as glass, clear as ice, clear as the sharp blue sky above, clear as her face when she wakes in the morning.

Walking down the sidewalks of the…

itsliketheyknowus:

"Don’t go towards the light, Johnny. Stay here with your salad."

"If you want something badly enough, you make arrangements.
If you don’t want it badly enough, you make excuses."
— Hanif Kureishi
QuestionCole St. Clair's character hit home. Especially that bathroom chapter, when he was thinking of escape, of suicide or hurting himself and turning into a wolf instead. It was such a strong moment for me. But moments like that, are they a testament of strength or weakness? Or something else? Answer

maggie-stiefvater:

Cole St. Clair has always been a very personal character for me to write: I was very much like him when I was in college, although most people didn’t know it. The thing about Cole St. Clair is that he’s so damn happy and active and buoyant and dynamic — except for the parts when he’s not. As a teen, I didn’t realize suicidal ideation could be like that. I had seen it in media, and it generally accompanied long-term depression or political scandal (Hollywood, in case you’re wondering, is not a great place to learn about psychology). It wasn’t this sneaky thing that happened when all the air went out of your sails, when you stopped moving, when you looked at the future and were bored by what you saw. It wasn’t something that happened to people with great families. It wasn’t something that happened to people who had plenty of other options.

But it was, and I tried, and I’m glad it didn’t work. Any of the times. I know Sinner looks like a flippant werewolf novel on the outside, and I hope that most people will read it as a sharp-edged love story. But on the inside of the novel is the most truthful depiction of a certain sort of self-harm that I could manage. Both its causes, its effects, and its cure. I tried to not glamorize or sugar coat it. But I also tried to not make it look dingy, because that’s when teens start thinking that they must be one-of-a-kind and broken to feel the way they do when their lives aren’t really that bad.

You asked if it was strength or weakness, and I don’t think it’s either. I think it’s just the way some folks are wired — a certain disregard for self-preservation. But it doesn’t have to be a weapon. It’s a kind of fearlessness, and if you figure it out, it can be a great thing.